• Maryam Isa-Haslett

IT'S ALL ABOUT OUR MATERIALS!

Made with Linen Material
Maryam's Essential Linen Pouch

WHAT IS LINEN MATERIAL?

Linen is a general term for any material that has been made using fibres flax plant or Linum ustiatissimum. It is a natural plant fibre, known as cellulose, which is renowned to be one of the strongest and most durable available. Thanks to its long strands it has brilliant longevity. 

The flax strands are spun into yarns and can be blended with other fibres including cotton to make cotton linen fabric. Linen textiles come in all different weights and most are woven in closely sett plain weave constructions. 

Some popular linen textiles include:

Cotton linen fabric – cotton linen fabric, cool and smooth made with slub yarns. Linen blend – poly linen blend with a textured surface and natural ochre colour, Linen look – plain, open weave construct made from textured yarns with a matt finish.

 

How is it manufactured?

Linen is one of the oldest fabrics in the world dating back thousands of years.  It is laborious to manufacture. Flax is ready to be harvested for its fibres when the stem turns yellow and the seeds turn brown. The highest quality linens are made from flax plants that are hand harvested, thanks to the quality of the root when pulled up by hand. It is finer and suppler than machine harvested flax.

Flax stalks dry in the open air for several weeks before the seeds are removed. Then, flax is exposed to moisture to break down the pectin’s that bind the fibres together. Fibres are then separated from the straw and graded into short fibres to make coarser yarns or long fibres to make fine linen yarns. 

Carding draws out the long and short fibres into ribbons which are plied together on spinning looms. Fine yarn is wet spun to get it a shiny and smooth appearance, whereas the tow are normally dry spun giving a more rustic, napped yarn.  These are then woven into linen fabric and treated. 

Purposes of linen material

Many products are made with linen, thanks to its attributes and ability to hold dye; grey linen fabric is extremely popular in the fashion and interior world. Popular end uses include: Upholstery Drapes and curtains. Clothing; suits, jackets, dresses, blouses, trousers, and more Table cloths, Bedding and bed linen, Towels, Tea towels, Wall paper napkins Place-mats Furnishing fabrics Luggage Sewing thread.


Properties

Linen fabric is made from flax; a bast fibre which becomes softer through handling and washing. It is very comfortable and breathable, does not pill or stretch and resists wear from abrasion as well as dirt. 

A lot of linen fabric is UK made and dyed and you can purchase a wide range of linen fabric online. A lot of clothing, particularly summer clothing, is made from linen. This is mainly due to its natural wicking properties. It can gain up to 20% moisture before it starts to feel damp and has an innate ability to prevent bacterial growth. 

Characteristically, linen yarns are quite uneven and slubby which adds to its rustic look. Woven linen fabrics are strong as well as hard-wearing and have excellent wash-ability; they can be boiled and starched and take dye very well. 

Advantages of linen material

The plethora of qualities of linen makes it the perfect fabric to wear in the warmer months, as it keeps the wearer feeling cool and comfortable. The weave of the fibres allows for excellent airflow, and the fabric billows away from the body drying out excess moisture and allowing it to become cool again. 

Linen has a natural sheen and lustre with an earthy base tone which varies from beige to grey linen fabric. 

Linen also has medical advantages and can be used for internal sutures and bandages. It stimulates blood flow and is anti-bacterial as well as resistant to mildew. It is also eco-friendly, as flax plants don’t require irrigation. They need little or no pest control and require very little energy in processing.

WHAT IS VELVET MATERIAL?

Known for its luxurious softness and opulence, velvet material has been a favoured fabric for clothing and upholstery for decades. But what is velvet? A heavy, rich, and sumptuous textile, that has been woven since the Middle Ages, velvet is renowned for being associated with royalty.

Velvet is a woven warp pile fabric. Therefore, it is not a fibre, such as silk, cotton, or cashmere. The term refers to the weave. It is a woven tufted fabric, with cut threads distributed evenly along the ground material. Characteristically, it has a short, dense pile.

The quality of the textile is determined by the density of the pile tufts, and the way that they are anchored to the base fabric. There are many kinds of velvet. Some of the most renowned include: Marbled velvet – a beautiful marbled effect, created by the pile going in all directions. Velvet shimmer – a reinforced woven back, making it strong, with a shimmering face Plush velvet – thick, warm, and sumptuous with a very soft brushed face Cotton velvet – made using cotton yarns for both the pile and the ground. Less luxurious but harder wearing Antique velvet – woven with occasional slub weft yarns producing an uneven surface Brocade velvet – a velvet material where the pile is sheared at different lengths to create a pattern Crushed velvet – a normal, solid velvet in which the pile is pressed or crushed in different directions.


How is it manufactured?

When considering velvet manufacturing, the question of “what is velvet” is once again important.  As the name refers to a certain weave, velvet is a woven fabric. Woven as a double cloth on a specialist loom, that can weave 2 thicknesses of the textile at the same time. The 2 pieces of material are cut apart to create the distinctive pile effect. These 2 lengths of fabric are wound on individual take-up rolls.

It is a complex process, which gives an indication as to why it is renowned for being an expensive and luxurious fabric. Velvet can be made from natural – such as cotton, wool or linen - or synthetic – such as rayon, polyester or viscose - fibres.

Purposes of velvet material

Velvet material can give any room or wardrobe an instant luxurious aesthetic. Cotton velvet is a very popular choice when it comes to clothing. From skirts, blazers and coats, velvet is an excellent choice, especially for autumn and winter fashion.

Thanks to its durability and elegance, velvet is a popular choice for upholstery and interior décor. Home furnishings such as cushions, bed coverings, drapes, curtains, and furniture upholstery are given a deluxe and gilded air when made in velvet.

Properties

Smooth and luxurious, with many different variants, velvet is one of the world’s best loved fabrics. It is heavy and durable with a lustrous sheen. However, many properties depend on the type of material or fibre used to make the velvet fabric: Silk velvet has a shimmering, almost fluid surface. It also has a soft and more flexible drape, Synthetic velvets, made from acetate or rayon, mirror the strong sheen, but the drape is not as natural and fluid In general velvet is: Luxurious, versatile.


Advantages of velvet material

Velvet is a versatile fabric and can be used for both interiors, upholstery, and clothing. It is soft and opulent, and is seeing increasing popularity in both areas.

Originally, the ground fibre was made from cotton and the pile fibre was silk. However, nowadays both the pile and ground fibres are woven in several different types of fibres, which makes it a far more universal and affordable fabric.

This is a key advantage of velvet fabric. What once was a textile only affordable for the affluent few, is now made with so many fibres, that it can be used by most.


What is velvet material?

Known for its luxurious softness and opulence, velvet material has been a favoured fabric for clothing and upholstery for decades. But what is velvet? A heavy, rich, and sumptuous textile, that has been woven since the Middle Ages, velvet is renowned for being associated with royalty.

Velvet is a woven warp pile fabric. Therefore, it is not a fibre, such as silk, cotton, or cashmere. The term refers to the weave. It is a woven tufted fabric, with cut threads distributed evenly along the ground material. Characteristically, it has a short, dense pile.

The quality of the textile is determined by the density of the pile tufts, and the way that they are anchored to the base fabric. There are many kinds of velvet. Some of the most renowned include: Marbled velvet – a beautiful marbled effect, created by the pile going in all directions

Velvet shimmer – a reinforced woven back, making it strong, with a shimmering face

Plush velvet – thick, warm, and sumptuous with a very soft brushed face

Cotton velvet – made using cotton yarns for both the pile and the ground. Less luxurious but harder wearing

Antique velvet – woven with occasional slub weft yarns producing an uneven surface

Brocade velvet – a velvet material where the pile is sheared at different lengths to create a pattern

Crushed velvet – a normal, solid velvet in which the pile is pressed or crushed in different directions.


How is it manufactured?

When considering velvet manufacturing, the question of “what is velvet” is once again important.  As the name refers to a certain weave, velvet is a woven fabric.

Woven as a double cloth on a specialist loom, that can weave 2 thicknesses of the textile at the same time. The 2 pieces of material are cut apart to create the distinctive pile effect. These 2 lengths of fabric are wound on individual take-up rolls.

It is a complex process, which gives an indication as to why it is renowned for being an expensive and luxurious fabric. Velvet can be made from natural – such as cotton, wool or linen - or synthetic – such as rayon, polyester or viscose - fibres.

Purposes of velvet material

Velvet material can give any room or wardrobe an instant luxurious aesthetic. Cotton velvet is a very popular choice when it comes to clothing. From skirts, blazers and coats, velvet is an excellent choice, especially for autumn and winter fashion.

Thanks to its durability and elegance, velvet is a popular choice for upholstery and interior décor. Home furnishings such as cushions, bed coverings, drapes, curtains, and furniture upholstery are given a deluxe and gilded air when made in velvet.

Properties

Smooth and luxurious, with many different variants, velvet is one of the world’s best loved fabrics. It is heavy and durable with a lustrous sheen. However, many properties depend on the type of material or fibre used to make the velvet fabric: Silk velvet has a shimmering, almost fluid surface. It also has a soft and more flexible drape. Synthetic velvets, made from acetate or rayon, mirror the strong sheen, but the drape is not as natural and fluid In general velvet is: Luxurious Heavy Soft Elegant Comfortable Warm Structured


Advantages of velvet material

Velvet is a versatile fabric and can be used for both interiors, upholstery, and clothing. It is soft and opulent, and is seeing increasing popularity in both areas.

Originally, the ground fibre was made from cotton and the pile fibre was silk. However, nowadays both the pile and ground fibres are woven in several different types of fibres, which makes it a far more universal and affordable fabric.

This is a key advantage of velvet fabric. What once was a textile only affordable for the affluent few, is now made with so many fibres, that it can be used by most.


(More on this to be continued insha ALLAH)

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